MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Thursday, June 3, 2010

Colonial Gardens. Part 4.2 Monticello Vegetable Garden




*
The recreation of the Monticello vegetable garden began in 1979 and included two years of archaeological excavation that attempted to confirm details of the documentary evidence.
Thomas Jefferson's vegetable garden resembled a terraced space 80 feet wide and 1,000 feet long, cut into the hillside and supported by a massive stone wall.
*


*
The 2-acre garden included 24 growing plots or "squares". They were organized according to which part of the plant was harvested - roots (beets, carrots), leaves (lettuce, cabbage) or fruits (beans, tomatoes).
*

*
"While Jefferson cultivated common crops like cucumbers, cabbages, and beans (both "snaps"for fresh use and varieties that were dried), he also prized his sea kale (Cramber maritima), a perennial cabbage-like species whose spring spouts were blanched with pots, then cut and prepared like asparagus."
*


*


*
"Salads were an important part of Jefferson's diet. He would note the planting of lettuce and radishes every two weeks through the growing season, grow interesting greens like orach, corn salad, endive, and nasturtiums, and plant sesame in order to manufacture a suitable salad oil. While the English pea is considered his favorite vegetable, he also cherished figs, asparagus, artichokes, and such "new" vegetables as tomatoes, eggplant, broccoli, and cauliflower."
I never heard about orach. Did you? Orach (other names: mountain spinach, French spinach, sea purslane) is an annual plant grown for its leaves, which are used like spinach.
*


*
I don't think I will ever forget these gardens extending to the foggy hills ...
*


*
The garden was not only a source for the family table, but also a laboratory where Jefferson planted about 330 varieties of more than 70 species of vegetables.
*


*
Nowdays, the garden serves as a preservation seed bank of Jefferson-era and 19th-century vegetable varieties.
*

*
"I have lived temperately, eating little animal food, and that... as a condiment for the vegetables, which constitute my principal diet"- Jefferson to Vine Utley, 1819
*

Pavilion, used by Jefferson as a retreat, was reconstructed in 1984
*


*
Joinery* Chimney. This was one of Virginia's best-equipped woodworking shops. Here, skilled white and enslaved joiners created some of the finest architectural woodwork in Virginia. The joiners also made furniture for Monticello.
*Another new word for me: Joinery - a factory producing wooden products such as tables, doors, and cabinets; cabinetmaking.
*


*


*
Below the vegetable garden wall, was a 6-acre orchard. It included a nursery where Jefferson propagated special plants.
*


*

*
A lot of vegetables grown in the kitchen garden ended in this kitchen:
*


*
With its French copper cookware and a multiple-burner charcoal-fired stew stove, the kitchen was among the best equipped in Virginia.
*

*


*
*
I have a strong desire to return to Monticello and spend probably the whole day there learning more about a person who wrote:
"...all my wishes end, where I hope my days will end, at Monticello" Thomas Jefferson, 1787
*
Credits: T. Jefferson. Monticello. A Guide for Visitors; The Gardens of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello by Peter J. Hatch. Peter J. Hatch is a Director of Gardens and Grounds since 1977.
My previous Colonial Gardens posts are here: Part 1 - Jamestown , Part 2 - Yorktown, Colonial Gardens. Part 3 - Williamsburg, Colonial Gardens. Part 4.1 Monticello .

21 comments:

  1. That is definitely something to aspire to. Beautiful pictures and very well written, by the way.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Tatyana,
    I loved looking at your pictures of The Gardens. I hope I can make it up that way to visit again...I was there once as a student. I love that Jefferson's favorite vegetable was English peas. It is mine too. Ahh to have 1000 feet x 80 feet of weedfree healthy vegetables. Hmmm... don't think I am capable of that nor do I have free labor available...willing to work for food. Ha.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Can you even imagine having a garden this beautiful? Thank you so much for sharing it with us.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Lovely, wonderful photos of this historic place and the pastoral scenes were marvelous. Now? I am hungry for some fresh veggies. ha

    ReplyDelete
  5. What a wonderful garden! It's so big.

    ReplyDelete
  6. A lovely post Tatyana, I never knew Jefferson was such an avid connoisseur of vegetables. How can you not respect someone whose favorite vegetable is the English pea? The garden though rather puts ours to shame, but it's beautiful, and I love the kitchen too!

    ReplyDelete
  7. The most beautiful vegetable gardens I've ever seen.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Beautiful garden! Your pictures are so lovely and made me wanting to live there for a while :) That picture with gardens extending to the foggy hills is so gorgeous and peaceful!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I have always loved Thomas Jefferson and love learning more about him. Thanks for taking us along. Now I'm gonna check out the posts I missed about the Colonial Gardens.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thank you, these trips of yours are so interesting.

    If you haven't seen it:

    Thomas Jefferson's Favorite Vegetables

    http://www.twinleaf.org/articles/vegetables.html

    ReplyDelete
  11. Now that is just not right Tatyana. Where are the weeds in that garden LOL! It looks so wonderful with all those fresh veggies. I am so enjoying your tour with all of its old antiques and way of living.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Tatyana, wonderful post, photos and history. Seeing the Pavilion in these photos brought back good memories of being there. When I lived near Washington years ago, this is one of the places we would take visitors. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Tatyana,
    Great posting enjoyed all fo it! Seems this big garden had a lot of folks to feed a big family, guests and of course the slaves on the plantation.

    ReplyDelete
  14. What lovely photos. Living out west I never get to enjoy such old buildings and deep history. Thanks for sharing. These were marvelous!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Pretty amazing gentleman, wasn't he Tatyana? I love your photos and details. BTW, Orach seed is available at Nichols Garden nursery [dot com] I just bought some today. How coincidental is that?

    I look forward to your next installment.

    ReplyDelete
  16. It's all the structures that really make it for me.

    Great tour.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Wonderful plant location.
    Is seen as a skilled hand specialist.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Not only beautiful but very informational! Lovely post, Tatyana!

    ReplyDelete
  19. An amazing garden! I envy you getting to see Monticello, Tatyana; it's one of many places I would love to visit.

    ReplyDelete
  20. What a wonderful place. I am glad you showed us how beautiful of a place he had. It's so great that they have restored it right down to the vegetables so they too can be preserved.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Outstanding post! Truly makes you want to be there…on my to do list ASAP. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by and for your comment! I appreciate your time! See you soon on your blog!

Blog Archive

Search This Blog

Follow by Email

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

I'M GLAD TO SEE YOU!

Labels

Abyssinian Banana Actaea s. Alaska Amaryllis Amur Maple Aquilegia Aralia Arundel Castle Gardens Autumn Before and After Berry Bird Houses Blotanical Blue Poppy Book review Bouquets Butchart Gardens California Calla Canada Clematis Coleus Conifers Containers Corydalis Dahlia Dan Klennert Dogs Elandan Gardens End of Month View England Euphorbia Eze France Exotic garden Fall garden Favorite plants Favorite plants. Tree Philodendron Fences Foliage Formal gardens Foxglove France Fuchsia Garden elements Garden works Gardening Tips Gardens of nature Gardens to see Gardens to see (tours) Geraniums Germany Giveaway Giverny Grasses Great Dixter gunnera Hampton Court Hellebores Herbs and Vegetables Heronswood Hidcote History of gardening Holidays Hops Hosta Hydrangea Illumination Italy Japanese maple Kew Lakewold Gardens Lavatera Lavender Leucosceptrum stellipilum ‘Ogon' Lobelia tupa Meconopsis Melianthus major Minter Gardens Missouri Botanical Garden My Garden My Open Garden MY PICTURE OF THE DAY Neighborhood NPA Open Gardens NWFGS Oregon Pampas grass Peony Perennials Plant ID Poppy Problem areas Recipes Rhododendron Rock garden Romneya c. Russia and Russian Art Sarah P. Duke Gardens Serre de la Madone (Lawrence Johnston) Shade Garden Shrubs Sissinghurst Sky Watch Slope garden Slugs Spring/Summer garden Stachys Succulents Summer/Fall garden The Garden of Great Depression Tree Peony Trees Trips Tulip Festival Uncategorized WA Weigela Wells Medina Nursery White garden Wild animals Wild flowers Winter and winter garden Wordless Wednesday
Copyright 2009-2017 TatyanaS, MySecretGarden Blog



-->

Thank you! Best 130 Gardening Blogs

*