MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Colonial Gardens. Part 4.1 Monticello


*
This stone wall and mass of flowers were the first things I saw at Monticello. Right then, I knew I was about to see something special.
***
"No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden." Thomas Jefferson, 1811
*

*
It took 40 years for Jefferson to design, construct and remodel his house. Inside and out, he incorporated design elements from famous buildings of antiquity. Do you see a dome? It was the first dome on an American house.
*

*
This is one of the L-shaped terraces that serve as extensions of the main floor. By incorporating these open-air living spaces Jefferson related his house to the landscape.
*

*

*
"There were walks, and borders, and flowers, that I have never seen or heard of anywhere else. Some of them were in bloom from early in the spring until late in the winter"-
Monticello Overseer Edmund Bacon
*
*
*
Twenty oval-shaped flower beds were laid out and planted at the four corners of the house.
*

*
The serpentine design of the flower walk and the oval island beds reflect Jefferson's interest in the informal style of landscape design.
*

*
I loved reading a book that I bought at Monticello, "The Gardens of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello"by Peter J. Hatch. According to this book,
nowdays, they plant flower gardens three times a year. In spring and summer, there are tulips, sweet William, Canterbury bells, foxglove, old rose species, sweet pea, larkspur, stock, poppies, calendula, zinnia, geranium, heliotrope, marigolds, snapdragons. These species plants reflect the undeveloped flower that Jefferson would have cultivated. They have low proportion of flowers to foliage, leggy and some have simple, single flowers. The effect is more like a wildflower garden as the plants grow up and set seed, which is then collected and packaged for distribution.
Some ornamental species grown in the early 19th century were quite evolved: the flowers were doubled, their petals might be striped, fringed, or mottled. The restored gardens include some cultivars of columbine, sweet pea, primrose, clove pink and wallflower which were known in the early 1800s. When a flower grown by Jefferson was highly developed but unavailable today, modern cultivars that resemble the earlier variety are grown. This is the case with hyacinths, tulips, anemones and china asters.
*
*
Peter J. Hatch writes in his book: "The flower gardens virtually disappeared after Jefferson's death in 1826 but were restored by The Garden Club of Virginia between 1939 and 1941." I am taking my hat to those ladies! "Researches found Jefferson's sketches of the beds and borders, and deciphered the depression of the winding flower walk by shining the headlights of their automobiles across the West Lawn at night". I found it facinated that " ... perennial bulbs continued to flourish along the border 115 years after Jefferson's death and so outlined its location"!
*
Next part of my Colonial Gardens series will be devoted to the Kitchen Garden of Monticello.

*
Credits: T. Jefferson. Monticello. A Guide for Visitors; The Gardens of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello by Peter J. Hatch. Peter J. Hatch is a Director of Gardens and Grounds since 1977.
***
My previous Colonial Gardens posts are here: Part 1 - Jamestown , Part 2 - Yorktown, Colonial Gardens. Part 3 - Williamsburg.

Copyright 2010 TatyanaS

19 comments:

  1. I love that Thomas Jefferson believed gardens and the beauty of gardens was vital to a house's appeal, and a person's spirit ! Great tour again, Gina

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm loving following your trip and the pictures of Monticello are beautiful. I have heard the gardens there are fantastic and know that Jefferson was quite a horticulturalist. On my list of places to visit sometime, Linda

    ReplyDelete
  3. The architecture alone is stunning -- but those gardens are something spectacular! How beautiful, and thank you for sharing them with us.

    ReplyDelete
  4. An awe-inspiring place. Paradise on earth! It's good to know our forefathers appreciated the Earth and its bounty. I can't help but think, though, what I could do myself with a million dollars or so. Wouldn't it be awesome to have a hand in creating such a place?

    ReplyDelete
  5. The veggie garden photo is so nice.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I loved Monticello. When we visited, it was very hot and the children were furious because I insisted on taking the garden tour, which meant standing around in the heat. I'm afraid I didn't listen very hard to their complaints!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi,
    Beautiful house, it's a dream house, the same for the garden.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Tatyana, I have never visited Monticello, but it has been on my "should visit" list for quite a while now. Next spring, when I am back in southern PA and within fairly easy driving distance of Monticello, I intend to get there! Thanks for the inspiration. -Jean

    ReplyDelete
  9. I was at Monitcello over 10 years ago and it is a beautiful place. I'd love to go there when the iris are blooming.

    ReplyDelete
  10. It's so sad to think that these gardens were almost lost. Kudos to the ladies for restoring them. Thank you so much for the garden tour, I haven't yet made it to Monticello, but it's definitely on my list. Even the vegetable gardens look tidy!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I toured his place many many years ago. Thanks for the reminder ....

    ReplyDelete
  12. Enamored by Monticello, yet have never visited, this post holds my heart, Tatyana. Thank you for sharing, dear gardening friend. Can't wait to see the Kitchen Garden :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. I think Jefferson would be proud of the way his home and gardens look today. Thanks for the great tour!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Another place that takes me back to my childhood! It's nice to see it again thru your eyes. It really is an amazing place and seems so advanced for that time.

    ReplyDelete
  15. These are such fascinating posts, and what great photos.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Tatyana that was an amazing tour .. I loved it !
    Those design elements would be perfect on a smaller scale in a private home as well .. it is universal for gardeners to want open living spaces .. to be able to admire their gardens while sitting comfortably ? LOL
    Truly though .. that was a gorgeous tour and I am a fan of kitchen gardens so I want to see that post for sure !
    Joy : )

    ReplyDelete
  17. That is one place I would love to visit. I had read about all of the gardens and flowers Thomas Jefferson had. Was there a large conservatory there? It all must have been so beautiful. You really had a wonderful tour of the colonial sites. You probably enjoyed it more than the kids LOL!

    ReplyDelete
  18. That is beautiful, and still has a grace, and elegance throughout the years.

    I love the photo of the pond, the partial reflection...

    Jen

    ReplyDelete
  19. Ooh I just feel like I got a little mini-vacay looking at these photos. Thank you for sharing!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by and for your comment! I appreciate your time! See you soon on your blog!

Blog Archive

Search This Blog

Follow by Email

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

I'M GLAD TO SEE YOU!

Labels

Abyssinian Banana Actaea s. Alaska Amaryllis Amur Maple Aquilegia Aralia Arundel Castle Gardens Autumn Before and After Berry Bird Houses Blotanical Blue Poppy Book review Botanical Gardens Bouquets Butchart Gardens California Calla Canada Clematis Coleus Conifers Containers Corydalis Dahlia Dan Klennert Dogs Elandan Gardens End of Month View England Euphorbia Eze France Exotic garden Fall garden Favorite plants Favorite plants. Tree Philodendron Fences Foliage Formal gardens Foxglove France Fuchsia Garden elements Garden works Gardening Tips Gardens of nature Gardens to see Gardens to see (tours) Geraniums Germany Giveaway Giverny Grasses Great Dixter Greenhouse gunnera Hampton Court Hellebores Herbs and Vegetables Heronswood Hidcote History of gardening Holidays Hops Hosta Hydrangea Illumination Italy Japanese maple Kew Lakewold Gardens Lavatera Lavender Leucosceptrum stellipilum ‘Ogon' Lobelia tupa Meconopsis Melianthus major Minter Gardens Missouri Botanical Garden My Garden My Open Garden MY PICTURE OF THE DAY Neighborhood NPA Open Gardens NWFGS Old Goat Farm Oregon Pampas grass Peony Perennials Plant ID Poppy Problem areas Recipes Rhododendron Rock garden Romneya c. Russia and Russian Art Sarah P. Duke Gardens Serre de la Madone (Lawrence Johnston) Shade Garden Shrubs Sissinghurst Sky Watch Slope garden Slugs Spring/Summer garden Stachys Succulents Summer/Fall garden Texas Arboretum The Garden of Great Depression Tree Peony Trees Trips Tulip Festival Uncategorized Vegetable garden WA Weigela Wells Medina Nursery White garden Wild animals Wild flowers Wineries Winter and winter garden Wordless Wednesday
Copyright 2009-2017 TatyanaS, MySecretGarden Blog



-->

Thank you! Best 130 Gardening Blogs

*