MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Friday, May 21, 2010

Gardens Of The First Colonies. Part 1 - Jamestown

Historic Jamestown provided a surprise for me during a recent trip to the east coast with a group of fifth-graders studying colonial times.
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This site of America's first permanent English colony has amazing outdoor living-history areas, including gardens!
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Want to see how the vegetable gardens of early 1600s Virginia people looked? Come with me! Tobacco, herbs, corn, vegetables...
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In 1607, a group of 104 English men and boys landed on the bank of the James River after a 4.5 month voyage. Sponsored by the Virginia Company of London, they came in search of profits and resources. In the 13 years before the pilgrims landed at Plymouth (Massachusetts), they would endure hardships, Indian encounters and the struggles of daily life...
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Many things have changed since then, but some have not. Don't you think so?
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Do you see the ships on the picture above? They are replicas of the Susan Constant, Godspeed and Discovery, the original ships used to traverse the Atlantic when Jamestown was first founded.
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The next post from this series will have pictures of the gardens of historic Yorktown. Come over to look at them. Trust me, you won't regret it.
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Copyright 2010 TatyanaS

16 comments:

  1. I don't know if I'm more impressed with these quaint gardens and your photos or that you were brave enough to chaperone 5th graders ( for overnight trips it looks like ) to the East. IMPRESSIVE !!! Gina

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  2. Tatyana, bless you for being a part of the trip with your children, and thank you for sharing these amazing photos of the working farm. Do you think the children grasped how noble an event that was?

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  3. The small mounds everywhere, is that where they've hidden the bodies?

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  4. So interesting and lovely, and I agree, not dissimilar to today in many ways. :)

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  5. Terrific photos, Tatyana;
    A few years back, we did a bicycle trip along the Potomac River tow path through a number of civil war towns, battlefields, etc. It's pretty amazing. What fun for you to introduce this history to the youngsters.

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  6. Great pictures! I have always wanted to visit Jamestown. I am going to have to plan a trip soon. Have a nice weekend! Carla

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  7. Love anything to do with history - I hope the children enjoyed the trip as much as you! It must have been interesting to learn how those farmers coped with the conditions there compared to the climate they had been used to in England.

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  8. Great pictures Tatyana, and I think you were brave to chaperone a bunch of 5th graders on a trip across the country. I am looking forward to the next installment.

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  9. So interesting to see how people lived and worked then. What a coincidence you brought up Plymouth...your pictures and story remind me of Plimoth (yes, correct spelling:) Plantation in Massachusetts.
    Thanks for sharing pictures of your historic trip!

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  10. Tatyana - great pictures, I haven't been to Jamestown in about 20 years during a family vacation. My great, great (forget how many greats..) grandfather was one of those original Jamestown settlers from England. I've always been amazed how any of them survived (although many didn't) that first winter. They were certainly not prepared! It's a fascinating piece of history. And yes, I'm impressed you brought a group of 5th graders. Can't wait to here about the rest of your trip East, Linda

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  11. Thank you for this enlightening post, dear Tatyana. We learn from the best and am in constant awe of those who have paved the path.

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  12. Another great post - lead on ...

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  13. I have been to Jamestown, many, many years ago and although I know I did not appreciate it as I should, I did enjoy the trip. Plymouth Plantation in Massachusetts is well worth a visit too. I love being able to see re-enactments of every day life "way back then" and never cease to wonder at how well they did in a wilderness in a strange land far far from home and help , no phones, internet, modern science and medicines. Still, seems kind of nice, doesn't it?

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  14. I think my husband would have preferred for us to take a trip up to Jamestown, instead of Monticello for my birthday next week lol. Cool pics! That place is definitely on my 'bucket list' :)

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  15. Jamestown is a tragic story really... a story that would never have been told if not for the aid of the Native Americans, who came to the settlers rescue. We so often forget that our forefathers did not come to a land free of peoples. There were villages all up and down the east coast, where people lived and related to the land and it's seasons of harvest. It was heavily populated, when Spain sent ships too . . . much cruelty was shown then and later with the J. settlers and Captain Smith. Having said all that ... the charm of these gardens and simplicity of tools is lovely... quite a trip for fifth graders! My farm is only two hours from Boston Tatyana. I hope you had a great visit!

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  16. We visited Williamsburg when my daughters were very small. We loved seeing all the quaint fences and costumes. It sure is romanticized but I know it must have been hard work for most of those people in those times.
    Thanks for stopping by my blog.

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Thank you for stopping by and for your comment! I appreciate your time! See you soon on your blog!

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