MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Wednesday, August 5, 2009

Black Krim. My Picture Of The Day


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Heirloom tomato from Crimea region of Black Sea (Ukraine). Crimea is pronounced KRYM (KRIM) in Russian.


Remember this? The "Big Three" at the Yalta Conference, Crimea, 1945: Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin.

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P.S.Very often people ask when to pick Black Krim tomatoes. Before they get soft! Better earlier than later.
***Copyright TatyanaS

28 comments:

  1. Those are beautiful tomatoes, and huge too! I am sure they are every bit as scrumptious as they look.

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  2. Thanks, Tatyana. I'd seen the name Black Crim before, but had no idea of its origin.

    My daughter spent a month in Ukraine a year ago in May -- I kept urging her to head south to the Black Sea while she was there, but she wasn't able to.

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  3. This must be healthy and delicious.

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  4. They are robust looking!
    Rosey

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  5. Like the look of those - lovely colour.

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  6. I've heard of black crim tomatoes before, how do they taste? And thanks for checking out my zucchini week!

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  7. Lovely looking tomato.

    I am watching my Black Russian tomatoes ripening, and I should be able to pick the first one in a few days.

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  8. Thank you for letting me know where the name came from. These look delicious!
    Enjoy...
    Sherry

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  9. What gorgeous tomatoes, and a beautifully artistic shot of them! Yum.

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  10. I love the Black Russian tomatoes. They are by far my favorite.

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  11. Ну, не зря же я второй день томатный соус варю - у Татьяны аппетитные томатики в блоге!:-) Красавцы!!!

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  12. I have never grown the black Russian tomatoes. But, this winter my daughter has grown one bush in her small walled garden. On sunday she has brought me one big tomato. She was very proud to be able to grow them here. (post: A small walled garden; 10/febr.09)

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  13. Those tomatoes look so yummy! Wish we had more red ones here... with the bad weather we've had all summer everyone where I live is having tomato problems. -Jackie

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  14. I've never seen or heard of this variety before, but it's good to learn of one that grows well here. How lucky to have them ready to pick already!! We usually don't have any this early, but with the heat they seem to be ripening quickly.
    How is your grass looking so pretty and green? Mine is brown :(

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  15. Таня, пишу радуясь!
    (Без всяких знаков препинания! Достаточно того, что препинаюсь, сдерживая "души прекрасные порывы"...)
    Ты - Посол Мира!
    Многие годы думаю об этом и убеждаясь в этом.
    Обнимаю!

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  16. You've got the colour perfect in that photo.

    A perfect Black Krim

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  17. Hi Tatyana, yum! Black Krim was our best tasting variety last season. I believe there are some volunteer seedlings of it this year too. Thanks for the history lesson! :-)
    Frances

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  18. Neat picture! I planted four of these this year, and the first two tomatoes are close to ripe - I can't wait!

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  19. Awesome photo, I'm going to try growing those next year, but am afraid that the nights will be too cool for them.

    This year I'm trying Black Prince, a Siberian cultivar. We'll see how they turn out. :)

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  20. Oh my word! Those tomatoes are LOVELY and the picture is beautiful. It's a classic photo and a keeper! What a "red" thumb you have.

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  21. One of the most delicious tomatoes ever, isn't it? I got my hands on one plant of Black Krim this year (and one Caspian Pink) so I have my two favourite tomatoes to enjoy, though not for a few weeks yet.

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  22. I won't even say how jealous I am!

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  23. Привет, Таня. Happened accidently to your blog in the search for answers and hope you can help me. The thing is that I'm trying this variaty (Black Krim) too this year but I'm having problems. Tomatos doesn't seem to mature at all. At the moment when first dark spots appear they start to rot. I just can't figure out what's wrong. The plants are in the greenhouse (that should make up the fact that this summer has been rainy and relatively cold) and my location is Estonia. Do you know what may be the cause of all it? Can you suggest something to do, change or avoid when growing this variety?

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  24. Hello Aivar! There could be several reasons. First, I would check Tomatoe Blights on Google. I'd compare the symptoms of T.B. with your tomatoes' symptoms. What about the leaves? If it's T.B., it's bad. In the U.S. many people lost all their tomato plants. If it doesn't look like T.B., it might be just overwatering. When tomatoes are ripening, they don't need much water. I read that some people stop water them at all at that point. I reduce watering considerably. If there is something wrong with the leaves too, I usually use magnezium (раствор марганцовки).
    Good luck!

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  25. I find it amusing that people keep referring to the black krim as a black Russian tomato.

    To set the record straight, here is a little bit of history:

    The origin of the black krim is the Isle of Krim, off the Crimean Peninsula. Crimea is part of Ukraine and hence it is a Ukrainian tomato and NOT a Russian tomato.

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