MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Plant ID needed


I am almost sure you did it too: picked up seeds from a plant growing in a garden or park with the hope that a plant will grow in your own garden. This is what I did four years ago when we visited beautiful San Juan Island. The blooms were already gone so I couldn't see them. The seedpods were intact. It looks like the seeds were good since I have the plant! However, there are two problems. First, it doesn't bloom. I suppose it should bloom. If not, where would the seeds come from? Second, what is the name of the plant? Does anyone have any ideas?
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The plant is perennial. Spreads naturally, and I have three plants already. Nothing more to say. Here are the pictures.
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The size can be seen in the next picture. I traced the unknown plant with O.
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This is the scan of a branch.

The foliage is pretty attractive, but I hope it is something that will bloom one day.
I hope it's not some poisonous plant. It grew in a garden visited by many people, so I guess it shouldn't be. I touched it many times in my garden and never had any skin problems.
Zone 7. Deciduous.
Please, help!
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Copyright 2011 TatyanaS

31 comments:

  1. I have no ideas---yet, does the foliage have a fragrance? Are the stems round or square? I would be curious about those answers...it kind of looks like a Valerian officinalis, though am not sure why it isn't blooming.

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  2. I wish I knew what it was too! Seems like it might be tropical coming from San Juan? It almost looks like an astilbe but I know that is not right. I hope you ID it! Bloggers are so helpful when they know something. Sorry I can't help. Have a great day!

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  3. Thank you Janet! No strong fragrance. Stems... I'd say round, but I need to recheck.

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  4. Tina, it's zone 7 I think. I agree, it looks like an astilbe a bit. Thanks!

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  5. This is one of the best reasons for garden blogging! I need to ask more questions like yours. I know I have more than a few things I need some input/advice with...
    Hopefully someone will come along and pinpoint this plant for you. Mysteries are fun...especially when they can be solved! Maybe it's one of those late bloomers that just needs a good amount of time (as in a few years!) to establish itself in a new environment before it finally 'takes off'!

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  6. That would be a green plant. With leaves. Also known by it's latin name of Greenus Leafus Plantus. You're welcome. Send the check to Castle Turling.

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  7. It's very pretty and seems to like you yard! Could it be Goatsbeard? It's similar to Astillbe but gets larger. Here's a link to a picture.
    http://www.hgtv.com/landscaping/goatsbeard/index.html

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  8. It reminds me of Aruncus dioicus foliage, but I don't think that is quite right either. Do you remember what the seedpod looked like? Is it evergreen here, or deciduous?

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  9. Hmm - it does look astilbe-ish, hopefully it will flower for you, as it seems so happy and lush in your garden.

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  10. Hi Tatyana.

    I don´t really know.
    Astilbe perhaps.But it should have bloom already for the plant is so big.
    The leafs looks like Filipendula ulmaria. ???I guess.
    This plant grows where its moist soil.

    Thanks for visiting me.

    Have a great week
    Hugs
    Gunilla

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  11. Catherine and Alison, I've looked at Aruncus d. and should say that it's a very good guess! In this case, my plant might need a partial shade. Now, it grows in full sun. I'll try to find more pictures to compare. Thank you!

    Cyndy, it does look happy! I'd be more happy if it bloomed!

    Turling, the check is in the mailus!

    Jan, you are so right! I hope we'll idendify this plant!

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  12. Thank you Gunilla! I looked at the Meadowsweet's pictures. It's a very attractive plant.

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  13. Dear Tatyana, I don't have a clue. I am in zone 5 --- that's my excuse! Please post the answer when you find it. P x

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  14. Hi Tatyana, sorry I can't help either but looks nice and healthy even though not blooming for you. Be sure and let us know what you find out.

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  15. Tatyana, I can't guess this plant. Is it a shrub, a perennial or does it grow into a tree? I would not worry about the flowers. Some plants needtime to produce their first flowers. If it is a perennial it will flower in the second year after palnting. Let yourself be surpris astilbe. I always collect seed and many times I am without a name for them!

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  16. hi Tatyana,
    sorry I can't help either.
    Pretty sure I have not come across in around the tropical region - so, probably you got some clue about its zone limits.

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  17. I'm sorry I haven't been by to see your pictures and comment on your blog. I haven't been feeling well. I don't know what it is either, but do tell when you learn the name!

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  18. Tatyana: Now I will be curious about your ID of the plant. I will have to check back.

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  19. Tatyana, my first thoughts when I saw it was Filipendula, the leaf and the habit look right. They tend to like being in a semi shaded position to flower well and will not tolerate drying out. However on second thoughts I am wondering if it is in fact a weed. sorry not much help after all. look at my Filipendula.

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  20. I always figure these things out by using a plant key from a field guide or reference book. There are not that many plants with opposite compound leaves. Have fun!

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  21. Ouch! I don't want it to be a weed!I might move one plant to a semi shady place and watch it for a couple of seasons. After that, if there is no flowers - bye-bye my love, bye-bye...

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  22. I'll go along with Pam's English Garden and cop out to being in a much colder zone so I have no idea what that plant is. I like the guesses though.

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  23. Hi Tatyana,
    This might be Astilbe biternata, the only North American native Astilbe. It looks a lot like Aruncus dioicus, and often goes by the common name of "False Goatsbeard." If this A. biternata, Zone 8 is the warm end of its range, so it might need part shade and lots of moisture to thrive. -Jean

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  24. Tatyana, my first guess was that it is an astilbe, but, I wonder if it isn't good old fashioned snow on the mountain (Aegopodium)--the kind that isn't variegated. I say this because I have a terrible time keeping it out of my front gardens. I yank it out daily. I had planted a lovely astilbe but discovered that I couldn't quite tell the difference between the astilbe and the aegopodium. I finally gave up and just removed the astilbe. If there are runners, then it's probably aegopodium.

    Nancy

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  25. Thank you people! We have four candidates now:
    Aruncus dioicus
    Filipendula ulmaria
    Aegopodium
    Astilbe biternata
    I am getting a bit scared. If it's some type of aegopodium, I need to remove it as soon as possible. It does spread!

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  26. You have me stumped on that one. No idea what it is, but it sure is nice to see all that green. We are zone 7/8 and the only green around here is a few of my narcissus poking their stems out. Longing for spring.
    Debbie

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  27. Hi Tatyana..as always you shots very beautiful pictures. About the Id I have no idea, beyond my gardening limits. Hope you will get the ID soon.

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  28. Hi Tatyana, it doesn't look like any of the many astilbes in my garden - they have much more feathery looking leaves and bloom very reliably. Hope you figure it out. I loved the glimpse of your walled garden with the urn in the middle - it looks positively gorgeous. Barbara

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  29. I see you have some ideas, but aren't sure what your mystery plant is. I'm afraid I can't help you, either. The foliage is nice looking.

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  30. AnonymousMay 28, 2013

    Do you still run this blog? It's been a while since anyone posted anything but I love a mystery and got enthralled. My vote is for Aruncus dioicus since it hadn't flowered yet and it's common for these plants to take 4-5 years to establish before flowering. It may be a long shot, but any news?

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous, the news: I dug it out a couple of years ago, and now it grows in the container in shade. No flowers yet. New growth continues to emerge constantly in the previous spot, and I keep removing it. It's a monster... It looks very similar to Aruncus d., but not 100%...
      P.S. Next time, please, use a name, any name, because anonymous comments usually go to spam folder.

      Delete

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