MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Friday, January 7, 2011

Sprucing Up A Vegetable Garden -2

Sprucing Up A Vegetable Garden has been one of the most popular posts on MySecretGarden blog. It's time to add more great ideas to my collection of beautiful and practical vegetable gardens. I thank all those generous people who opened their gardens and allowed me to take pictures. I take my hat off to them for their creativity, friendliness and willingness to share their ideas with other gardeners.

From the herb bed, above, the brick path leads to the very neat and orderly vegetable garden of Sandy and Arne. I remember spending a lot of time in this garden. There was so much to see and learn!

This was Arne's first attempt to grow tomatoes upside down.

Isn't it a good example of how almost each square inch of ground can be used?

Lifting tomato plants up saves a lot of space! Hanging tomatoes get more warmth than those in the ground, there are very few weeds and a smaller chance to acquire soil borne diseases. Watering can be a problem, but do you see the watering system that Arne created?

Attention: I don't know how the harvest of the hanging tomatoes did from this particular garden. There are a number of sites with information about growing tomatoes upside down. One of the articles is here. If you read the comments to it, you'll see that some people had good results and other people didn't have any success with this method. Of course, we all know that 2010 was not a good tomato year.
Weeding is reduced considerably with the use of weed suppressing fabric.

Supports for climbing plants can be folded for out of season storage.

In the picture below, four ways of growing vegetables can be spotted: raised beds, upside down, containers and in the ground.

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The next picture is from Jim's garden. I plan to make support cages for my tomato plants using the same type of reinforcing metal mesh. Plastic protects plants from cold.

The next four pictures show Ernie's vegetable garden. Inexpensive PVC pipes and twine are used here. And, by the way, look at those onions! Onions and tomatoes are companion plants.


I like how Ernie uses the garden shed and twine to provide support for runner beans growing in black plastic containers.

Bamboo stakes, in the pictures above and below, is another type of support. In my garden, I also use bamboo stakes and folding bamboo towers. They are light, easy to move and store, and they look attractive.

Above picture shows Barbara and Jim's vegetable garden
In this beautiful garden of Jeff and Judy, below, wooden frames with metal mesh serve, if I am not mistaken, to support fava beans.


Besides bamboos, look at that great espaliered fruit tree at the house wall!

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Even simple branches can be used to provide support for light-weight plants as in the Monticello vegetable garden:

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The next three pictures show tomato boxes and potting benches made by Nilsen Woodworks:



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Disclaimer: This post is not intended to recommend any of these ways of growing vegetables and herbs. It just illustrates how different people approach vegetable gardening.
Best of luck with the gardening approach you elect to use this year!
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Copyright 2010 TatyanaS

52 comments:

  1. I can see this being a really popular post too. You have captured some beautiful vegetable gardens. I can not even pick a favorite because there is so many creative ideas to make them a fine addition to anyone's garden who may want to borrow the ideas. The structures are what got my attention.

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  2. I'm not a veg gardener but I find this very interesting having come from a long line of folks who were! Larry

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  3. Tatyana, this is a great post. I was fascinated by the upsidedown tomato plants, saw an article on this last year. I have a small raised bed so I am always looking for ways to use space.

    Eileen

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  4. Enlightening visits to other peoples gardens. Cant say I really get the upside down tomato thing. Great to see how gardeners are alike worldwide.

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  5. Thank you everyone! Upside down or not but those tomatoes need to be better in 2011! Last year was the absolutely worst tomato year for me.

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  6. Happy new year to you! I don't have a vegetable garden. Your pictures make me wish that I did!

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  7. Such an interesting and informative post, Tatyana. Your accompanying pics are marvellous! I've gleaned some super ideas and developed The Green Eye for those magnificent tomato boxes!

    Truly some incredibly imaginative, creative and gifted gardeners all around this planet! It's such a privilege to be able to share in so many of them through blogging :)

    Thank you, Tatyana...a lovely post to kick start the new year :)

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  8. So many designs and concepts.... all add up to a beautiful vegetable garden. Cheers, ~bangchik

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  9. all so great in their own way.I love scented geraniums so that when it rains that wondeful scent carries through..and mints..

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  10. Thanks for sharing such wonderful ideas. I like using bamboo and wood in my garden. The last photo on the wooden stake for tomatoes is my favorite.

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  11. Wow, those are some really well-organized gardens! I think the suspended tomatoes looks like something you'd see in the spacey Epcot Center greenhouse. I agree with your fava bean identification, too.

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  12. Those bamboo stakes for beans remind me of Monticello. And the name of them, 'tuteurs', sound really exotic which make me sound more sophisticated. ;)

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  13. I wanted to let you know your post was
    so beautiful that it is featured on
    WebGarden today. Our readers enjoy
    getting ideas and inspiration. I hope
    many will follow your blog after visiting.
    Thanks for sharing your gardening talents!
    ~Brooke (CreativeCountryMom)
    http://creativecountrymom.blogspot.com/
    Here is the link to see your post....
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/WebGarden/261885457648?ref=ts

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  14. Great ideas on how to support different veggies. My mom tried the upsidedown bag for tomatoes and it was SOOO heavy, didn't work well for her.

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  15. Thank you!
    Yes, Janet, they can be very heavy. I think Arne put a lot of thought into it and organized everything very well. But it is certainly not for everyone!

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  16. I see why this is popular for you Tatyana. There are some incredible ideas here. It's inspiring too. I saw something I want to try!

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  17. It's take many effort to maintain this garden. Anyway the garden so interesting. Thanks for sharing. Great post.

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  18. There is a lot of imagination in some of these gardens. What wonderful experiences you have had. Thanks for sharing gardens I would never know about.

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  19. Great ideas and materials for plant supports! As for my plants, Im using my chain fence for support. Great post Tatyana!

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  20. Great series/photos/inspiration, Tatyana ... I'm drooling in envy. Why can't we have it all :) Happy Gardening New Year!

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  21. Thanks so much for posting these great photos! I was especially interested in the one that used PVC pipe to make hoops over the tomatoes. I've been planning to do something similar this year with mine. I'm going to put some plastic over them as well to get as much warmth on them as possible. I think I may have gotten one tomato from my garden this past year, because of the cool summer we had. I just have to do better!

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  22. You not only made me miss my veggies even more than I already do, but made me realize how meager my setup is, which Mr. Sorry has been encouraging me to improve for the coming spring. Wait 'til I tell him I want a swooping brick path! Good idea to leave the PVC hoops up during summer to support the tomatoes.

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  23. wow so fascinating all the different ways of growing and containing the vegetables. Thanks for this - it was very informative!

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  24. So many wonderful ideas. Thank you. I've just been showing my husband to see if he can make those A frames for climbers. He wandered off without commenting.

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  25. I think you might have just solved one of my dilemmas. I have been trying to come up with a way of supporting peas which I can move around the allotment. I love the folding screens and am going to show them to my son in the hope that he can make me the same - thanks

    Isnt the bloggersphere a wonderful resource

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  26. Jam packed with very creative ideas. I have tried so many tomato supports I can't count, and have settled for now on the metal cages from Gardeners Supply that fold flat for storage. Like the growing upside down idea and have been considering it for a while--nice illustration of that. Carolyn

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  27. Thank you for posting this Tatyana. Many marvellous inspiration and ideas. I have been thinking of growing hanging tomatoes for sometime but keep slacking off. I will give the idea some consideration now.

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  28. Tatyana,

    Lovely use of space in the garden. Meg and I might try a few of those folding trellises.

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  29. Dear Tatyana, Thank you so much for this virtual tour. One can learn so much from visiting other gardens. I am so envious of the garden with the view of water! Wishing you a happy and healthy 2011! P x

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  30. Very inspiring! Thanks so much, can't wiat for spring here in NE Pa. ~GJ

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  31. Tatyana, I really enjoyed your post. The pictures inspired me--now I'll get my husband to build some of the trellis's for our plants. We have gardening in common so I'd love to share my garden photos with you. Please visit my garden at http://www.mysisterdalesgarden.com look in photo gallery 1 for all the new photos. I have lots of flower pictures.
    See you in the garden,
    Miriam

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  32. There are some great ideas here, and proof that vegetable gardens can be beautiful. I will try to do better with mine this year. i promise!

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  33. Wow, excellent ideas. Where do I start? I thoroughly enjoyed this post!

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  34. Dear Tatyana,

    I am glad I found your blog. I loved you Russia and Russian art posts a lot. Thank you for sharing them.

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  35. Tatyana,

    All really great ideas and I know a lot of them work as I've used them- very neat looking too, which is always a plus so the garden doesn't keep you out, so to speak! I especially like the large grid reinforcing metal mesh and use it for a few things- that reminds me that I need to go get a few!

    Thanks for stopping by!

    Tessa

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  36. Wow - that is one seriously organised vegetable garden - much better than the chaos round my way. Best wished for the new year.

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  37. What very clever fold away supports and what very elegant gardens!

    I understand the point about upside down tomatoes and have sometimes thought about trying to grow a plant that way - but I can't get round to liking it.

    Esther

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  38. Lots of great ideas here Tatyana - thanks for that. I've got to come up with some new ideas for plant supports as most of my bamboo stakes, netting etc were lost in the arson attack on our potting shed at Christmas :( but at least I get to start from scratch with new ideas :)

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  39. There are some great and enviable ideas in this post, although I don't care for the way the upside down tomatoes look. But I'd love to have one of those wooden tomato containers.

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  40. I love seeing how other have their gardens. This is a great post.

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  41. Great post, I've already gotten a few ideas on how to improve my veggie garden this coming year!

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  42. I am always so IMPRESSED with all that you do and have going on. I love looking at your pictures because you seem to live in an ideal home and have the most wonderful looking gardens! Thank you for sharing a little bit of you with me! BTW, did I tell you I changed my blog's domain? I can now be found at www.MyLiveLaughBlog.com. Thanks again!

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  43. Tatyana,
    This was an amazing post!!! I love all the ideas that home gardeners come up with to 'make things work' for them and their garden space. So many wonderful ideas... You've really got me planning again! :)

    I love the fact that you found these garden tours.. I'll have to research around here and see if anyone offers that sort of thing here!

    Thanks so much for sharing your beautiful pics!

    Hugs,
    Wendy / sassyb

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  44. Hi Tatyana~~ This post just proves that vegetable gardens can be every bit as lovely as a flower garden. I love your examples of different supports. I might just try the topsy turvey this summer. Who knows?

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  45. Tatyana, thanks for sharing these beautiful creative images of vegetable gardens. I'm always inspired by looking at other's designs. I love to combine function with aesthetic beauty.

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  46. Wow, those are such ideas for the urban gardener who has limited space. It also looks fun and productive.

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  47. Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful. Who says that vegetable gardens can't be gorgeous AND functiional.

    I'm inspired and hope it is sunny tomorrow so I can get busy.

    Green dreams,

    Sharon Lovejoy Writes from Sunflower House and a Little Green Island

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  48. Nice pics! Sure makes one think ahead to summer!

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  49. I love how you've used your space so wisely...and I really love your brick path...so very charming!

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  50. Thank you everyone for your comments! I also learned a lot from these gardens.
    Scott, I wish I had such a vegetable garden, but it's not mine!

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  51. Your amaryllis is beautiful. My mom loves and grows it. Id didn't know it could live 75 years, I should tell her:-). Amaryllis is actually called hippeastrum, and means "horseman's star" (I think).

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  52. The brick path is stellar. Great work!!

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Thank you for stopping by and for your comment! I appreciate your time! See you soon on your blog!

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