MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Saturday, January 15, 2011

January White and Reds

I wanted some snow. I got it. It came in the evening and was gone by the next night.
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Streaks of falling snow can be seen in this picture:

While white was the color that excited me outside, red is the color which excited me inside.
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The Amaryllis flowers are not very big but the dark velvety color is asking to be called royal, dramatic and even poignant. It looks much lighter in the picture.
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Do you remember the Apple Blossom Amaryllis from my Ugly Duckling Amaryllis Story? Its bulb took a month-long break and now has new leaves coming. Wouldn't it be neat if it rebloomed? No? Never say never! But even narrow long and flat green leaves make, on their own, a nice sight in a house in winter, don't you think so? I even love the bulbs themselves! It is said that Amaryllis is cultivated for its beautiful and colorful flowers. But, just look at these huge, roughly textured beauties:
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When I look at these bulbs, I think about the power, energy and promise hidden in them! Isn't it amazing that an Amaryllis bulb is able to produce blooms for up to 75 years! Do you move your Amaryllis bulbs to the garden for summer and let them grow there before the next holiday season?
This year, instead of a poinsettia, we bought an arrangement of live plants which I plan to transfer to my garden in spring.
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Poinsettia, cyclamens, variegated ivy and .... can anyone remind me of the name of the little evergreens with light edges? This planter came from Canada's Rainbow Greenhouses. Thank you Canadian friends!
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I see three seasons in this picture: the lonely leaf is left from the autumn, the snow tells 'winter' and the light piece of the sky symbolises the spring. Spring is only around the corner.
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P.S. The third part of Sprucing Up a Vegetable Garden is coming sooon!

Copyright 2011 TatyanaS

47 comments:

  1. Tatyana, I am a fan of amaryllis too. I like the first photos here, of your plants covered with snow; very dramatic.

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  2. Thank you Terra! I know that mediterranean palms are tough, but I still brush the snow off their leaves.

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  3. From you, I've now learnt that amaryllis will produce blooms for 75 years - I had no knowledge of this prior to reading it in your post today! Astounding! I've only ever had one amaryllis bulb myself - I bought it last year and am pleased that it's sending up new green leaves. No sign of any flower as yet.

    I agree - the papery bulbs are very interesting.

    Love your snow scenes!

    Sorry, I can't help with identifying the little plant in your container (thought it might be of the conifer family).

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  4. Tatyana, after seeing your beautiful anaryllis, I am sorry I didn't start a few more later.

    Eileen

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  5. Hi Tatyana. Your Amaryllis is so lovely. I am going to put mine out in the garden this summer because they did not bloom for me keeping them in the dark all summer. I was so disappointed. I will try again though. That floral arrangement is so pretty. I have never saw a combination of plantings like that in any containers. Have a wonderful weekend and go play in the snow. LOL!

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  6. Desiree, thank you! It's difficult to believe, isn't it? I am sure not many people take proper care of it so that it would survive for so long!
    Eileen, thanks! We bought this amaryllis planter right before the Christmas. You are right, it's nice to have them blooming in different times.
    Lona, I've been told in one of the nurseries that in Holland, amaryllis bulbs grow huge in the fields, and they recommended me to plant my bulbs in the garden for summer. Good luck with your plant!

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  7. I never new that fact on amaryllis.75 years is quite amazing. Like you I put them out but I always forget to bring them back in. My one amaryllis is probably no more.

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  8. Donna, thanks! Several years ago, I planted one bulb outside, and it got rotten! I chose wrong place, too wet.

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  9. I love anything that blooms indoors in the winter - such a treat!

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  10. Hi Tatyana, you're a poetess of the garden! Gorgeous Amaryllis, btw!

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  11. Liza, you are so right! Thank you!
    dona, thanks! I should show your comment to my husband. He tells me that I use wrong words sometimes. For example, in this post, "the snow tells 'winter'"- he says that snow can't talk!

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  12. Terrific post! I have overwinterd amaryllis outside during the summer, then bring them in before frost. Once the leaves have browned, I don't water during this period, I cut them back and let it rest. By November it should be sprouting again and voila new flowers for winter!

    Sorry, I can't see the evergreens clearly enough to identify them.

    You're doing a great job beautifying your home through winter!

    Shirley, Edmonton

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  13. I love your snow covered palms - look like some mad cake decoration.

    I am determined to get my amarylis bulb to reflower next year, I need to make sure I look after it properly

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  14. Shirley, thank you! In your words it sounds so easy! I'll try to follow your tips!
    Helen, thanks! Let's try to remember and discuss our amaryllis experiences in fall!

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  15. Hi Tatyana,

    Lovely photos, it's so nice to see some colour from the Amaryllis!

    I hope you see some colour in the garden soon enough :)

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  16. I had no idea about the longevity of amaryllis - the cyclamen planting is stunning - love most the snowy palms!

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  17. Thank you, Liz! Main color outside is green now. Primulas are blooming, yellow and purple.
    Cyndy, thank you! I've learned just recently myself. Amazing! They live as long as people!

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  18. Did the snow do any damage to your plants? We've gotten plenty here and more to share. I'm only praying that spring is around the corner. I'm definitely not a "cold" climate person, although I've always lived in the "cold". Your amaryllis is beautiful.I did not know that their bulb can produce blooms up to 75 year! That's amazing.

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  19. So happy snow found you, dear Tatyana ... we are blessed with your photos! My life was so crazy this past holiday (with daughter in hospital and oldest son's newborn), I was unable to capture my stunning amaryllis that came/went :( as did other blooms during the fleeting weeks. I like that both you and I focused on a lonely leaf in our posts ... you caught my drift and I caught yours :)

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  20. That planter is beautiful. When the plants outgrow the planter, you can still grow them on the ground. Hmmm...you are giving me ideas. Thanks.

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  21. Jen,thanks! The snow came when it was warm, and the temperatures didn't go lower than 30 degrees. But, we had hard freeze before. I'll see later if there are victims among my plants.
    Joey, thank you! I needed that snow. The winter wouldn't be real for me without it. Now, I can start thinking about the spring!I love that lonely leaf in your collage!
    One, thank you! Yes, I will move the plants to my garden later!

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  22. Beautiful! I'm an amaryllis nut. And yes, I save mine from year to year. I plant them outside for summer, then bring them in before frost. They lie dormant in the basement until late November when I start potting them up again. I need to pot some more up this weekend!

    Are those a palm of some sort that has the snow on them? How do they do with the snow?

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  23. Thank you Kylee! Those are Mediterranean palms, they are hardy in the Pacific Northwest.

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  24. So glad that you got a little snow. Hope you enjoyed it! Carla

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  25. Thank you, Carla! Yes, I've gotten what I wanted.

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  26. Hi Tatyana, despite winter you have brought lots of colour inside your home. I do admire the Amaryllis which In my garden are called "Hippies. Yes, I think too that bulbs are amazing, storing food and waiting until the time is right to send out the beauties in there dazzling colours. The snow covered leaves look very attractive.

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  27. I'm glad you got some snow. I did not know that amaryllis could be so long-lived!

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  28. Very artistic snow! Love the Hipp.

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  29. Gorgeous Amaryllis, keep your cold winter so warm and beautiful! I love the idea of having a planter with mixed plants in them..

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  30. I think the little evergreens might be selaginella, but I'm not a 100% sure. Beautiful amaryllis!

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  31. I had no idea amaryllises lived for 75 years. I plant mine in the garden and when they bloom they are spectacular. The light dusting of snow is so beautiful, that is what I wish for.

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  32. Wow, the snow on those palm-looking leaves reminds me of a big tropical bird. For the amaryllis I'm lucky enough to permanently plant them in the garden after they're done cheering up the house -- my zone is just barely the temp they like.

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  33. Hi Tatyana, I had no idea that amaryllis bulbs had such long lives.It would be a shame not to keep them going from year to year. Your cyclamen planter is lovely. Enjoy the rest of the weekend. Jennifer

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  34. Thanks Tatyana for appreciating my Philippines sunset photos. It really is inspiring when a good photographer appreciates it. I normally come to visit here for your beatiful shots. Now about the amaryllis, bloggers inspired me to try a small experiment last year to force them to flower, just put them in water instead of waiting for the rainy season. We have only dry and wet season, btw. And i posted it earlier than the sunset post. How i wish i can see that red amaryllis here too, as i havent spotted it yet around here. My orange seems to have lenthy stalks than your red.

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  35. Glad you got some snow!
    I have a couple more amaryllis which may give me some blooms. If not, I have some paperwhites coming along nicely.

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  36. Thank you everyone! I'm glad no one said that he/she didn't like an amaryllis. It seems that this plant is everyone's favorite! Now, we need to find out whose plant is the oldest!

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  37. A bit of snow can really brighten a garden! But, houseplants can lift the spirit even more!Beautiful blooms~I love Apple Blossom, I hope it reblooms for you! gail

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  38. A repeat bloom would be wonderful! I love those cyclamen..need to get some.

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  39. I love your optimistic attitude in the last photo, Tatyana--I am ready for spring, too! Your amaryllis is lovely and such a great way to brighten up a dreary winter's day.

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  40. Hi Tatyana, I like amaryllis bulbs too. Great photos. I like your idea of a mixed container instead of a single poinsettia. Nice.

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  41. Tatyana that was like having Christmas all over again girl ! LOL
    The kiwi information from my post:
    Hello Tatyana !
    I have two vines .. the ornamental one called "Artic Beauty" is on that arbor gate I posted for the carnival .. but the fruit producing one is with the grapes on this larger arbor .. it is Actinidia arguta 'Issai'
    hardy to zone 4 in Canada .. the fruit aren't "hairy" and they are smaller but you can eat the whole thing .. no need to peel !! AND .. the leaves are an amazing yellow gold in the Autumn ! Bonus !! LOL
    Info here : http://search.shelmerdine.com/NetPS-Engine.asp?CCID=11050002&page=pdp&PID=1691

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  42. I'm ever hopeful of some more snow over here!
    I love that amaryllis - it really brightens up a room and lifts the winter spirits :)

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  43. I would be happy to send you a bit of snow from Upstate NY- we have been getting continually hammered up here for the last two weeks.

    Just say the word.. lol

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  44. Great to see your indoor garden blooming!

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  45. Ooh your amaryllis looks so pretty! Mine is still a stalk, but the flower bulb is getting more swollen every day. I can't wait to see the bloom. I think the little evergreens are selaginella. Quite a pretty container you have there too!

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  46. I think your wee plant in the container is selaginella (moss fern) Amaryllis, thanks for the information, we have always chucked it out after flowering.

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  47. Selaginella? Great! Thank you TS and Alistair!

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