MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Leucosceptrum stellipilum ‘Ogon'


I was asked about this plant when I posted several pictures of it earlier this season, so I decided to tell  more about it in a separate post.
It's Leucosceptrum stellipilum ‘Ogon'.
In this picture, it's the furthest plant on the right, next to Northern Sea Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium), with the hardy Schefflera (Schefflera delavayi) in the foreground.


I bought it from  Far Reaches Farm during the Heronswood Open Garden in September 2013.
The thing which sold that plant to me was its long and highly textured, scaly, with perfect geometric pattern, not opened yet blooms.
Just look at them!


This is its description from the Far Reaches Farm's website:

This tasteful perennial from Japan bides its time in the shade garden as the floral hoi polloi scrabble for attention during spring and summer. Once the fracas has died down, this takes center stage in September and October with its intricately constructed buds like little pieces of sculpture which open to fuzzy light lavender flowers. These are hefty plants.
  • Family: Lamiaceae
  • Hardiness: Zone 5
  • Mature Size: 3'
  • Exposure: Shade
  • Bloom Time: September - October
  • Moisture Needs: Average to Moist
  • Deer Resistant: Yes
  • Origin: Japan

I planted my Leucosceptrum  in a shady spot on the northern side of our house,
in front of a big hydrangea bush.  It is seen in the following picture behind the metal arch.


The soil there is average and consists of native sandy dirt and some added compost.
During dry spells, the spot gets enough moisture from the sprinkler system.
When it's raining, it can get a bit soggy there.
This Japanese woodlands' native is pleased by the shade of morning sun, which it gets here, and good moisture.




As the Far Reaches Farm description says, it has fuzzy light lavender flowers:


And fuzzy they are!




Leucosceptrum stellipilum is also called Japanese shrub mint, and, like other mints, is avoided by deer and rabbits.




When my plant gets some sun, its bottle-brush  flower spikes really stand out with the dark background from two hydrangeas.
Ironically, Leucosceptrum leaves are similar to those of hydrangea, and there is no contrast between them; however, I didn't have another good spot for it.


Candle-like flowers are very showy.
Lightly velvety serrated leaves vary in color from dark green to lighter green later in season.




It grew nicely into a decent size, about  2 1/2 feet (75 sm), shrub, died back in winter  and overwintered well in my zone 8 garden.


This is the description of Leucosceptrum from  Plant Delights Nursery

Leucosceptrum is a genus of hard-to-find Japanese subshrubs used primarily as woodland garden foliage plants. In many parts of the country, Leucosceptrum is a dieback perennial that reaches a healthy 3' x 3' by autumn. 
Leucosceptrum leaves are reminiscent of hydrangea with the added bonus of often being quite colorful. In fall, leucoseptrum plants produce small bottlebrush-like flowers...a nice addition during a time of year when the garden flowers are mostly finished.
Leucosceptrum is a woodland plant, preferring to grow on the edge of a woodland or in an open forest so that it gets morning sun. 
Other than that, Leucosceptrum is fairly flexible about soil and moisture. 
Leucosceptrum will re-flush with fresh new foliage when pruned back during the growing season. 
Try growing leucosceptrum with other shade-lovers like carex, ferns, and hostas. 



Here it is enjoying the company of blooming Lacecap Hydrangea 'Princess Lace'.
Its blooms lasted about a month in September-October and attracted bees.
It's a good addition to the other fall bloomers!

I'm joining with Loree at Danger Garden in her Favorite Plant This Week meme (well, my L. Ogon finished blooming, but it was my favorite plant for several weeks...)

***Copyright 2014 TatyanaS

33 comments:

  1. Great choice for a favorite!

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    1. Alison, thanks! Those spikes look attractive even now, after blooming finished.

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  2. Interesting plant And so beautiful Tatyana

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  3. A lovely shrub which I can see would come in very useful in light shade. Love the flower spikes !

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    1. Jane, thank you! The flower spikes look great before, during and after blooming!

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  4. The spiky Leucosceptrum flowers are a good combination with the flat Hydrangea flowers. A beautiful plant!

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  5. An unusual looking plant! That's really nice for some blooms in the fall when not too much is going on in the shade gardens! Very showy.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Indie! Yes, we need more showy plants for shade!

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  6. That is a nifty plant! You captured it in some magical light. I like the way the buds open into such a pretty form of sprays.

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    1. Beth, thank you! I also liked that this young plant had a lot of flowers!

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  7. Wow! The flower spikes are gorgeous and you've captured them superbly to show their fantastic display. The macro shots are my favourite! Thanks for sharing Tatyana... first time seeing this beauty. They aren't tropical plants, right?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Jacqueline! Your comment somehow went to a spam folder, so I just found it, month later! No, it's not tropical, it's from Japan. Suitable even for zone 5.

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  8. Your photos are beautiful as always, Tatyana! I'm busy thinking where I can put this interesting plant. So unusual to find a shade plant that flowers so late in the year. P. x

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    Replies
    1. Pam, thank you! The answer is - a container! I do this often, when I love plants but don't know where to place them in my garden. They grow in containers, sometimes for several years, and then, one day, suddenly - o-la-la! I see the spot in the garden for them!

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  9. I was not familiar with this plant at all, but what a great addition it would make to the shade garden! Having something blooming there so late in the season would be wonderful. Love the spiky blossoms--great photos as always, Tatyana!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Rose! It was a new plant for me, too! And it was love from the first sight!

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  10. Yep, those stacked unopened blooms do it for me too, a great addition to your garden, thanks for joining up and sharing your fav!

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    1. Loree, iIt was a great idea of yours to concentrate on one plant!

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  11. Oh, that would be a perfect plant for my garden! I have never seen it before, it looks lovely in your photos, thanks for all the info. Now what can I throw out to make room for it…..

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    Replies
    1. Helene, ha-ha, don't throw anything! How about a container?

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  12. Thanks for this post! I've heard of this plant and have been wanting to see better photos than what I'd seen online. I just love it!

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  13. Dear Tatyana, thanks for leaving a comment on my blog!
    I love the plant that you have portrait in this post. The juicy, saturated green leaves and the delicate lavender-white flower spikes go so well together. I like the combination that you have chosen with the Lacecap Hydrangea. Even though, as you mentioned, the leaves are similar and not contrasting the flowers do and they are a very lovely sight together.
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    Replies
    1. Christina, I agree, the flowers create a nice contrast in this case!

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  14. What a beautiful and unusual plant...love the flowering.

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    1. Donna, thanks! I am pleased with this addition to my garden.

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  15. Never seen it before Tatyana, I do like it, reminds me a little of Veronicastrum.

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    1. It is new for me too, Alistair! I do like Veronicastrum flowers. They are less fluffy, although.

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  16. You had me at 'deer-proof'! A new plant to my eyes(and ears!). And, it's pretty!
    Definitely off to a great start in your garden, Tatyana ;D

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by and for your comment! I appreciate your time! See you soon on your blog!

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