MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Sunday, September 1, 2013

The Garden of the Great Depression. Cascades of Time, Alberta, Canada

         This garden, opened in the middle of the Great Depression, in 1936, is different.
 I can't recall any other garden that looks similar.
          It was designed by architect Harold C. Beckett as a geological garden reflecting the evolution of rocks and plants in Canada's Rockies.
          Canada's government financed the project with the condition that 'relief ' workers would be used on it. The financing lasted until the cost reached $50,000. 
          The project was never finished, but  even what was done is pretty impressive. 
As the sign in the next picture says, it's like a memorial to its designer, the laborers who built it, and that era.


I was lucky to visit the garden when there weren't  many other guests.
But, I read that it almost never  crowded and often gets overlooked by tourists.
The garden is framed by big mature trees, was built like a terrace and has extensive stonework.
They say it has about 50,000 plants.






           These garden structures are made from tree trunks with burls.
Burl is a tree growth, in which the grain has grown in a deformed manner. It can be caused by stress connected to an injury, virus or fungus.
                                                              I saw burls in Alaska, too.












                                                 The walk through the garden is enjoyable, and I had a chance to admire the 
                                                                                           surrounding mountains.








 The garden is maintained by the Banff National Park Service.
This is its administrative building:

If you visit Banff National Park, you might want to stop by
 and have a relaxing break in this garden given its interesting history.

***Copyright 2013 TatyanaS

25 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing. what a beautiful place and gardens. Too bad it is filled with cheesy annuals. The perennials looks nice and the just the native beauty.

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous, ha-ha, never heard 'cheesy annuals'! I loved the perennial beds the most.

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  2. What a place! Pretty strange-looking those tree trunks with burls...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tiina, thanks! There should be a lot of stressed trees!

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  3. Replies
    1. Татьяна, спасибо, что нашли время написать! Я рада, что понравилось!

      Delete
  4. Beautiful garden in a stunning environment. Lovely little squirrel on one of the pictures. I am really impressed how it is surrounded by these high mountains. You were lucky there were no visitors on your way, but may be a pity that it's overlooked by tourists.

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    Replies
    1. Janneke, thank you! The garden looks like a small bright gem framed by mountains and trees.

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  5. What a beautiful, serene place! It's good that it's not packed to the rim with tourists, but too bad more people don't see it. Thanks for taking us along--I never would have known about it!

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    Replies
    1. PlantPostings, thank you! This garden was a pleasant surprise during our trip!

      Delete
  6. This is one of the most beautiful gardens I have ever seen with the rustic backdrop of the mountains and trees....I love the first shot!!

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    Replies
    1. Donna, thank you! I am wondering how it looks in spring.

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  7. This is so beautiful Tanya! The background of the majestic mountains make these gardens really extraordinary. Beautiful gardens set in gorgeous nature.
    Marian

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    Replies
    1. Marian, thank you! They compliment each other, don't they?

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  8. It is really beautiful. Other gardens were made the same way. Rockway Garden in Kitchener, Ontario, was also a make work project of the Great Depression. You can see the garden is in the mountains from the freshness of the blooms. In much of North America, our summers are too hot for blooms to stay fresh-looking very long.

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    Replies
    1. Alain, thank you! The flowers, for sure, enjoy that fresh clean mountain air! I looked at the Rockway Garden's pictures online - it's a lovely place!

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  9. Fantastic setting. The garden looks as if it is quite atmospheric - maybe reflecting its history. We have just finished a mini road trip of the great English gardens - Great Dixter, Hidcote, Sissinghurst etc - and it has such a different feel. More 'masculine' and muscular if you know what I mean !

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    Replies
    1. hoehoegrow, thanks! Well, now when you said that, yes, it does have such feel! Interesting!!!

      Delete
  10. Lovely photos and an interesting story. Were those delphiniums everywhere? And what were those tall blue flowers that looked a bit like giant blue snapdragons?

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    Replies
    1. Sarah, that's a very good question! The flowers are shaped almost like beans and yeas, remind snapdragons. I don't know. I'll post a question on Facebook. Maybe, someone knows.

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    2. Sarah, Heidi Kaster, the owner of Dragonfly Farms Nursery, believes it's aconitium or monks hood.

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  11. taking my breath away in an entirely different way complimenting the mountains

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  12. I want that bridge, I am not sure what I would do with it, but I want it.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by and for your comment! I appreciate your time! See you soon on your blog!

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