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U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

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Sunday, August 21, 2011

The Most Northwest Point in the U.S.

Four corners of the continental U.S. This August, I visited my final corner - the northwesternmost: Cape Flattery in the state of Washington. It just takes several hours to drive to that point from where we live.  Wonders next door - how often we miss them!
By the way, Seattle Garden Flingers-2011, you were just about three hours away from this place when you visited Dragonfly Farms!


That is the Makah Nation territory on the Olympic Peninsula. The Strait of Juan De Fuca joins Pacific Ocean here. 
This is the forest you need to go through to reach the Cape.


Enchanted woods...


 We saw a sign warning about a cougar, and a bear had been seen here recently. Grr!!!


 The trail is well equipped with boardwalks, stairs and viewing platforms. Before they were built by the Makah people, travelers needed to walk 3/4 of a mile through mud, debris and huge protruding tree roots.


This is my first look at the water:
  

It took my breath away:

 I love the wilderness. I love all types of it. I admire warm sea, exotics, palm trees and orchids. I love Florida, Hawaii  and other gorgeous places. Their beauty is relaxing, gentle and comforting. The beauty of Cape Flattery is calmless, dramatic, striking, poignant. It awakes all senses and emotions in me.  It's close to my heart.  It's more resonant with my life.

What will we see from this point?


Huge seastacks remind me of giant feet. Deep caves make me think about the power of nature.

 Strong currents, winds and frequent storms erode the stone. They say that some cliffs where we stood might disappear in several hundred years.

Again, don't you think it looks like giant feet?
 

In the next picture is Tatoosh Island with its lighthouse. It's named after one of the chiefs. It used to be a base for Indian fishermen and hunters, then for the coastguard. Now, it's inhibited by sea lions, birds and seals.
 

The Makah Indians were known as great fishermen and whale- and seal hunters. From the Cape, their ancestors witnessed the arrival of the first European expeditions.
 


Captain James Cook, the British explorer, gave the Cape its name in 1778.
 



The color of the water hypnotises me.


Look at these branches: they have hundreds of cones:



 Spruce, firs, ciders are amazing here. The area gets more than a hundred of inches of rain annually (250 cm)!


 I love these trunks with a turquoise hue:




What does the tree with a girl in front of it remind you of? Interesting shape, isn't it?
 

Little things are as interesting as big ones:




 A new life on the ruins of an old one:
 

Cape Flattery on the map. Vancouver Island of Canada is seen over the Strait of Juan De Fuca:
 

The Washington state coast is not as developed as, let's say, the Oregon coast. There are not many places for travelers to eat and sleep. Maybe, that is why it's not crowdy here.  The traffic was very light. Often, we found ourselves alone on spectacular beaches and trails. We loved it.
There are yet wilderness oasises where you can bond one on one with ancient trees, empty shores and breathtaking beauty.
Photographs are a pitiful replica of the true reality. But, anyway, thanks to them for the wonderful memories. 


Visit the Makah's people website.
I participate in Scenic Sunday.
***Copyright 2011 TatyanaS

36 comments:

  1. That was an amazing trek. Thank you for taking me along. Beautiful landscapes and love those caves. The boardwalks are great too. I'll bet they made a great sound as you walked on them.

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  2. You've been all over the place Tatyana, and while Germany, Europe, etc. has been beautiful, this place and these photos are truely stunning, staggering and indeed, breath taking. I'm planning a visit NOW because of these photos alone. WOW. Thanks for sharing.

    -Will

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  3. Gorgeous scenery! I want to see more of this wonderful continent :)

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  4. Tatanya, That is an amazing landscape. What beautiful atmospheric photographs.With a name like "Flattery" was there an Irish person involved?

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  5. Beautiful setting. I love your photos.

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  6. I love it when you go all of these places that I could go, and then I just get to stay home and enjoy your photos.

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  7. So very fascinating. The forest looks as old as time. Thanks for such wonderful photos, giving us a little taste of the beauty on the West coast. Breathtaking!

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  8. This is a gorgeous place and beautiful images that you took. I am in awe if those islands of rock with trees on top. The Tatoosh Island looks like it is from another country. That is an amazing scene.

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  9. Isn't this just the most amazing place? I took this walk on my very first visit to Washington about 7 years ago, and it is one of the reasons I fell in love with this state. So beautiful!

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  10. Gorgeous indeed. I can see the feet and the tree looks like a wine glass to me.

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  11. I've been there! Thanks for the memories, your photos are beautiful!

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  12. You captured the grandeur of the forests and the great stones and the water. I can well believe there could have been a cougar and certainly bears in the neighborhood. Glorious photography!

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  13. Love the cold, deep blue-green of the water. It draws your eye in. Very rustic, very gorgeous.

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  14. What a fascinating journey that must have been, and worth every second.

    I had no idea such beauty was there...and I have lived across in Vancouver all of my life.

    I think that the fact it wasn't packed with people certainly is a drawing point.

    Jen @ Muddy Boot Dreams

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  15. Amazing scenery! Such beauty! Your photos are fantastic! So glad I stopped by! Thoroughly enjoyed my visit - your newest follower,
    Kathy

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  16. No comment, Tania ! Thank you, for all this beauty !

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  17. Gorgeous virtual tour of a place I would love to visit in person.

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  18. So rugged and beautiful Tatyana. I would have loved to walk there. The water is such a beautiful green. It always amazes me that nature finds a way. Trees and ferns growing on rocks and cliff where there is little dirt and they stands up to the elements.

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  19. That scenery is amazing... I love the Danish landscape with its soft, rolling fields, but perhaps because that's what I grew up with, I'm very much drawn to dramatic scenery like in your pictures. I want to go...

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  20. This is one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen...and mostly nature-made. There is majesty and mystery in these places. I am very glad you post the photos very large so we can see the full view of these lovely spots.

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  21. Spectacular! Yeah, this definitely makes me want to take a trip to the Pacific Northwest! I love the way you combine grand scenic landscapes with eye-popping macros. I'm so glad I stopped by for this excellent post!

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  22. I love seeing landscapes like these, untainted wilderness, but when you are there maybe it looks scary too! I envy the structures there to facilitate walking and trekking. It might also be nice to have a fishing rod with you and just sit on one promontory. I can easily be lost in mind and body in those kind of surroundings. Your photos do justice to them and even magnify its beauty. Thanks for the tour.

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  23. Dear Tatyana, you have transported me to an enchanted forest and to the land of Big Feet! I love the rocky coastline and the vivid colors of the water. I love the ancient trees and the thick moss. I love the ferns and the fungus. I am on the opposite corner of the country, but part of my heart belongs to the Pacific Northwest! Thank you for sharing your trip with us.

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  24. Those are amazing pictures, Tatyana! Can't you just hear the sounds of the Makahs and imagine them living there when you look at the beautiful scenery?

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  25. Wonderful. Almost looks a bit chilly?

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  26. Amazing!!
    Wonderful post, Tanya!
    What a magnificent place, you seem to be a dot in front of such grandeur and this great force of nature! Definitely a wonderful holiday ;)

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  27. Dear Tatyana, I came back again to your beautiful pictures, not realizing I hadn't left a comment when I first took the tour with you. Amazing, stunning ... P. x

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  28. Breath-taking is an understatement. These photos leave you speechless.

    I love all the photos of the "island" area. Also, living in the woods, I appreciate the beauty of the board walk in the woods photo.

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  29. Incredible. Thank you for sharing. That is somewhere I would love to go. I am glad I could see it through your eyes.

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  30. I too love the temperate rain forest.
    Lake Quinault is one of my favorite places in the world. It fills my soul when I am there.
    Thank you for the lovely reminder of the marvelous Pacific Northwest...she is lovely in her wild dress.
    Sherry

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  31. Wow, I loved that trip. Thanks, Tatyana!

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  32. Tatyana, I visited this area a few years ago. Your pictures truly captured it as I remember it!!! Thank you for stirring up my memories.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for telling me that! It is nice when something doesn't change, don't you think so? There were not many people, and it is also was nice!

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