MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Wonderful Wednesday Whites

What are these trees?
Take a guess!

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Copyright 2010 TatyanaS

44 comments:

  1. Very nice! I would have to guess some form of magnolia(deciduous) from the flowers. What a fantastic bloomer though.

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  2. Gorgeous! They remind of the star magnolias (M. stellata) I grew in my old Atlanta garden.

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  3. Magnolia trees, sometimes called Tulip trees. I need to get one and saw the whites the other day but want the dark plum color.
    Beautiful trees beautiful pictures.

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  4. It looks like a type of magnolia. Am I right? Very pretty whatever it is.

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  5. Dear Tatyana, What wonderful fresh images of, if I am not mistaken, Magnolia stellata.

    I love the fringed, paper handkerchief blooms which give the tree an almost ethereal quality. It is sadly the case that Magnolia blossoms, all too often in the UK, are damaged by unexpected frosts. I do so hope that is not the case with these.

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  6. Lovely, lovely magnolias:-)
    Here in my country, the very proud, delicate bearer of spring itself.

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  7. Really lovely. Such a cheerful sight.

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  8. Japanese Magnolias or Tulip Trees..

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  9. I'm going with Magnolia stellata too. Beautiful but in my part of the country often caught out by frosts.

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  10. How beautiful!! Magnolia also sprung to mind, even though I have never seen one in person.

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  11. My guess would be Magnolia too. But whatever it is, it is just beautiful!

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  12. I am going to guess Star Magnolia as well. I have one now starting to bloom in my yard and I LOVE it.

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  13. You all are so good! Thank you! There are two types of magnolias shown here. One of them is a star M., but what is the other one? Anyone knows?

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  14. Perhaps Magnolia soulangeana 'Alba superba'--one of the Japanese magnolias.

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  15. Hi Tatyana

    Beautiful aren't they?

    I used to work in Ealing West London. Everyday as I queued in the car the last half an hour, to cover a quarter mile, I'd pass a most magnificent Magnolia blooming early in London's micro-climate. It always used to 'lift' me as I knew spring was just about here. Magnolias will always have a special place for me.

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  16. Looks like a saucer magnolia to me, Tatyana (M. soulangeana), but I don't usually see anything but the pink/purple varieties around here. :)

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  17. They look like a magnolia of some kind. They are gorgeous regardless!

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  18. Super beautiful..adorable whites! And such a powerful presence too!
    Kiki~

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  19. I love magnolias - there is a huge old magnolia in Leicester's Botanical Gardens and we always go to see it when it's in bloom (another few weeks) because it is so gloriously magnificent!

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  20. I actually thought it was a saucer magnolia. I had to look again to see the star magnolias when you said there were two kinds. A fantastic display of spring flowers:)

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  21. What a beauty. I really love Star Magnolias. You have captured them in wonderful photos.

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  22. Aren't they pretty! They look like Star Magnolias to me. I wish I had room for one.

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  23. What a beautiful magnolia, ours are just starting to bloom. Lovely year for them.

    Jen

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  24. Hi Tatyana~~

    I just posted photos of mine. It's a Magnolia stellata or Star Magnolia. They're fragrant even. You've got beautiful photos.

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  25. WOW! they are gorgeous...

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  26. Татьяна, как же тебе повезло соседствовать с такой красатой) А я посмотрела и мне чем-то напомнило нашу вербочку, по мохнатости наверно)У нас еще ничего не цветет снег лежит)Но уже почти 0 граусов)

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  27. Lovely Magnolias both of them. Made me wonder how many years it will take before mine will bloom? It's just a small stick / gittan

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  28. Beautiful, and the white flowers make them look so fresh.

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  29. Tatyana, I hope this beauty is in your garden! I adore Star magnolia...Our local botanical garden has a few prime specimins and when they don't get zapped by a late frost, they not only look scrumptious but smell delicious! Thank you for reminding me to pop over to Cheekwood to see if they are about to bloom. gail

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  30. I have two magnolia varieties (virginiana and grandiflora) and love, love, love the trees and fragrance!

    Wonderful photos!

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  31. Gorgeous whites, Tatyana!

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  32. I first saw magnolia trees in Victoria, British Columbia on the ground of the Empress Hotel. I didn't know what they were at the time, but they made me swoon. Who knew a tree could have such incredible blooms when all else looked so bare. Gorgeous photo!

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  33. Beautiful Magnolia! Too bad the internet does not have "scratch-and-sniff."

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  34. M. stellata, one of the very first things to bloom, and so welcome with that pristine star shaped bloom. That is the real harbinger of spring. Hooray! :-)
    Frances

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  35. Thank you! Based on your answers, can we say that Magnolia soulangeana is shown on the first three pictures, Magnolia stellata - on the last three pictures? M. stellata has star-like flowers.
    Gail, these particular beauties grow along the streets in our town. I took their pictures during my recent walk. There are two M. trees which belong to our neighbors and grow on the border between their and our gardens. They are starting blooming now.

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  36. Definitely a magnolia ... they are gorgeous!

    Have a great day.
    TTFN ~ Marydon

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  37. Your photos are gorgeous! Unfortunately we only grow annuals in our greenhouses so I have no idea what sort of tree this is.....it's pretty though :)

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  38. It looks like a Magnolia stellata... but maybe it is too big hard to see the trunk... I have a dwarf so maybe I am not seeing it right. I know it is a magnolia for all the petals eighteen at least ... a primitive tree! A gift from Japan for peace if it is the stellata. Beautiful photos Tatyana!

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  39. Possibly one of the loebneri magnolias? LC

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  40. Gorgeous! I think it is a magnolia liliflora.

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  41. You're ahead of us. Our magnolias are still only in bud.

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  42. Interesting about the Pampas Grass Tatyana. I see lots of it planted around here but I don't know if it's considered a noxious weed in our state or not? I'll have to check it out. I don't have any in my yard (now I won't) but many of my neighbors have it in theirs. Sounds like you'll be able to keep yours in check.
    You've already gotten lots of answers on the magnolia so I'll just say it's beautiful. Love any magnolia!!!
    PS So great you could do all you did in the garden already ~ your area is one of the few with a nice winter, that's for sure! Love how spring-like it already is ~ can't wait for my garden to look the same. :-)

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  43. Its a saucer magnolia!

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