MySecretGarden

U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

Friday, August 7, 2009

Plants Around a Church

While traveling in Alaska, I love to visit old churches. They are part of the history and have a very special place in my heart.
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Holy Assumption of the Virgin Mary Russian Orthodox Church.
In 1845, Father Nikolai Militov, a priest-monk, established a permanent parish in Kenai, Alaska. His original travel journals are in the Library of Congress.
The present church structure was built in 1895 to replace the first one which had fallen into dispair.

These icons are original and were brought by ships from Russia when crossing the ocean took months.
This chandelier came from Irkutsk, Russia in 19th century.
This is an active church. There are about a couple of dozen who attend, on average, every Sunday.
In 1970, The Holy Assumption Church was designated a National Historic Landmark.
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There was a moose watching us from behind the trees and crosses:
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Across the street from the church is the St. Nicholas Chapel, built in 1906.
It's a memorial chapel. It was built by the members of the villages surrounding Cook inlet. It's dedicated to Igumen Nicholai and his reader Makary Ivanoff. These two men delivered the small pox vaccine to all the villages they visited during their time.
The Chapel was constructed near the site of the original 1849 church that was in the northwest corner of the original Russian fur trading post, Fort St. Nicholas.
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Close to the church, there is one of the oldest buildings in Kenai, Oskolkof/Dolchok house.

Surnames such as: Oskolkoff, Lestenkoff, Peteroff, Belkoff, Kashevaroff, Denidoff, Abruska, Dementieff, Gabrieloff, Merculieff, Ivanoff, Tikhonoff, Selanoff still exist. Those Russians who were not married to the local Native Alaskan families had an option to return to Russia when the U.S. bought Alaska in 1867.
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Some of the information used was taken from a summary of the church history.
***Copyright TatyanaS

24 comments:

  1. How lovely it all is. I find the icons in the churches to be quite beautiful.

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  2. What a wonderful post: I really enjoyed visiting the churches with you. I love visiting churches/temples/synagogues of any creed and these were fascinating.

    Thank you Tatyana .

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  3. Hi Tatyana~~ What I noticed in the first photo was how pristine the building and fence are. Tidy and well cared for. Great post as usual.

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  4. What a good idea, looking for old churches! They are so beautiful!

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  5. Loved all these pictures! I really loved the chandelier in the church too...so ornate!

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  6. Just magnificent. The moose was cute too!

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  7. Tatyana, thanks for this beautiful history lesson. The churches are unique in design. I like the chandelier too. When I see the moose, it has a 'cheeky' look which makes me want to touch it and bring it home.

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  8. Tatyana,

    enjoyed my visit, your photos were beautiful and the commentary was delightful.

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  9. A moose eh? Great!!! You do such justice to the Alaska landscape. Those churches are lovely. Thanks for taking the time to capture them so well.

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  10. I enjoyed this interesting post! I didn't get to see this part of Alaska when I was there!

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  11. Hi Tatyana

    Really interesting post.

    You can tell straight away that the church is Russian.

    Beautiful photography as ever.

    PS Thanks for your comments on my other blog. The troglodite, location,location one cracked me up!

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  12. So interesting Tatyana and very picturesque too. I'm going to have to pay more attention to the churches in my area but I'm doubtful their gardens are anywhere near as tidy and colorful as these! Great information in your post too.

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  13. Hi Tatyana this is my first visit, I think, and anyhow, I was really impressed with this church and how neat it is. And the paintings are just fantastic. The old house is very nice too. What a marvelous place it is to live. But it would take some getting used to for me. I am from Ohio and the climate is a lot different but the buildings are not as nice here.

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  14. The churches are really charming, great post Tatyana.

    -Cathy

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  15. Thank you everyone, together and personally, for the time you took to read my post, look at the pictures and write the comments! I have pictures of several other churches in Alaska that I'd like to share in future. There is a piece of history behind each of them and I wish I was a better writer to tell their stories.

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  16. Beautiful church and very beautiful flowers. It is fascinating to read the local history behind a place.

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  17. Thank you for stopping at Abe Lincoln Blogs and for telling me the name of the beautiful flower there.

    I have also acknowledged your contribution and linked you and your blog from that blog post.

    I hope people come from Abe Lincoln Blogs to your blog. I know they will enjoy it.

    Thank you.

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  18. The church is just beautiful! It doesn't get any better than a moose peeking at ya!

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  19. Beautiful church, and what a piece of history. Although you should change the sale date to 1867 not 1967. I love visiting old buildings - all of them houses/churches/castles - doesn't matter where, it's so close to history you can almost touch it. Great photos!

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  20. Thanks for the lovely tour. It was so pretty!
    Rosey

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  21. Таня! Фотографии прекрасные!
    В душе такая благодать...
    Всем сердцем благодарю тебя!

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  22. Tatyana, wonderful photos and descriptions! You undoubtedly had an extended visit whereas ours was very short... enroute to catch our plane. Thank you!

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  23. What super pictures, thank you :) I particularly like the church ones; they remind me of the atmosphere of the scenes on the exquisite little painted boxes I can't afford to buy!

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Thank you for stopping by and for your comment! I appreciate your time! See you soon on your blog!

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