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U.S.A., Washington State. USDA zone 8a. Sunset climate zone 5

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Sunday, February 22, 2009

Amur Maple, Black Caviar and The Dog On My Blog

What is common between a maple in your yard and the dog on my blog? I didn't plan this post. Donna ( http://suburbansanctum.blogspot.com/ ) mentioned Amur maple in her blog recently. It created an association in my mind since Amur is not just an abstract name for me. Amur is also the name of our pup on the head picture of my blog that many Blotanists liked and wrote me about.
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Why did I give him this name?  Amur river forms the border between the Russian Far East and Northeastern China.
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It is the ninth longest river in the world and hosts a unique Kaluga fish - Нuso dauricas (Gеоrgi) - that can reach 5.6 m (16.8 ft) in length and 1000 kg (about 2000 lb) in weight. Kaluga is a predator (eats other fish including salmon) and can live up to 50 years. One fish can give a bucket of caviar, up to 40 kg (18 lb!!!).
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It is the biggest sturgeon in the world and it lives only in Amur river.
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It is sad but today it's not the river that I used to know and my Dad used to fish on. It's polluted by both countries (Russia and China), more shallow than before and its fish population is dramatically reducing. But let's get back to Amur maple.
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The Amur maple was introduced to North America in the 1860s. This is its description from
How Stuff Works
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The amur maple makes a small tree or tall shrub, growing to 25 feet high with smooth, light-gray bark on young branches. The leaves are small for a maple, only 3 inches long, toothed, and have three main lobes. They turn scarlet red in the fall. The seeds vary in color but, in the best clones, are bright red. The plant is one of the rare maples with flowers of any interest. Yellow and fragrant, they appear in spring before the leaves. How to grow amur maple: Plant the amur maple in just about any conditions, although it prefers good, well-drained soil and full sun or, at best, partial shade. It tolerates alkaline soils particularly well. It can be trained as a small tree through pruning or allowed to grow as a tall shrub. The tree grows relatively upright when young, but it eventually takes on a round-headed appearance. NOTE: This tree is invasive in central and northern North America.Uses for amur maple: A good tree for small lots and patio plantings, the amur maple is tolerant of city conditions and is relatively pest free. It makes an excellent screen or small specimen tree.

Pictures of the amur maple can be seen  
HERE
Well, what do we have here? The tree in your yard - the dog on my blog - the river on another continent ... Aren't we all connected somehow?



***Copyright TatyanaS

19 comments:

  1. Hi, Tatyana--
    What a fun connection between my tree and your poppy pup! (Thanks for the link!) Both of your dogs are gorgeous. I have a shepherd too, though he's a long-hair--a little fuzzier around the edges than yours. :) He's four years old and a big teddy bear. (You can see his photo on my Feb 8 post if you want.) Thanks for giving me the opportunity to visit your blog. I'll be back soon...

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  2. Great history and botany lesson. Your little pup is so sweet. Is he much bigger now?

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  3. Great post. That fish looks and sounds like a sturgeon here in the U.S. I wonder if it is related.

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  4. Very interesting post, Tatyanna. You really have come halfway around the world. Are you a caviar connoisseur? I suppose it's an acquired taste. I've wondered about your cutie pie dog. Cheers.

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  5. Donna, thanks for the comment and for the idea to write this post! The name Amur brings a lot of good memories. I remember little red maple behind our house, also. I love GS dogs, whether they short- or long-haired. My old one is a real garden dog, he follows me to the garden every time, even now when he half walks - half crawls because of the bad arthritis.

    Melanthia,thank you! The pup is almost 4 years old. I have his recent picture in one of my January posts.

    Flowrgirl1, you are absolutely right. Thanks for the question. I added a photo and a fact that it's the biggest sturgeon in the world.

    Grace, thanks! If you look at the map you'll see that it's not so far from the NW. It's just over the big pond! And yes, I love caviar, both red and black. I used to eat it(red)by big spoons! It wasn't difficult to buy it from fishermen. We would buy a liter (quart) or two, usually. My Dad used to fish for salmon and made caviar by himself.

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  6. Very interesting and I've always loved your doggie. I'm thinking of getting a dog. Every time I see one I start wanting one more.

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  7. Hi Tatyana - Fun to read these connections and learn a bit more about your hometown. I did a post a while back on some poorly-pruned trees here in Seattle that I wondered if they might be amur maples. If you have a second, do you want to see what you think? http://greenwalks.wordpress.com/2008/09/18/dr-seuss-trees/

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  8. Great post full of interesting information Tatyana.

    Take care/ Tyra

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  9. Yes, all connected. Interesting information too!

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  10. Very interesting post. Loved the photo of your hometown, and the dog is cute, too.

    Jan
    Always Growing

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  11. Great post. Now that's a big fish.

    Can you send me a plate of those Russian Piroshki, they look lovely.

    Rob

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  12. What a great post - I enjoyed all the connections
    :)
    Karen

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  13. A lovely post with a bit of everything in! Thank you.

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  14. Hi Tatyana - how nice to meet a neighbor (almost). Your gardens are absolutely beautiful! You're right about not being so excited about spring when ya think of the slugs. I guess I can hold off a bit longer now that I look at it that way. What are the Russian Piroshki made of (did I miss that somewhere)? The picture looks delicious. Thank you for visiting my blog. Linda

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  15. That puppy picture has got to be one of the cutest pictures I've seen. I somehow missed this post. It is pretty neat to see just how small the world is isn't it?!

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  16. We have a couple of Amur maples, one small, one large. The large one got damaged by our ice storm in December, so I don't know what it's going to be like once we can shape it up in the next few weeks before it starts its spring growth. I think they're pretty tough, though, so we're hopeful!

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  17. I don't have any of those things Tatyana, but, I'm sure we are still all connected in some way:) This is such neat info--it's sad that our world's rivers are so polluted:) The price we pay for industrialization, I guess:( I wouldn't have wanted to go on the river knowing fish that large were swimming under me! Your dad sounds like a very serious fisherman! Though I don't have this tree, I love the connection you came up with...and yes, your dog sniffing the poppy is irreplaceable!!! What a sweet little pup!

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  18. Hi there,

    This is a question for the webmaster/admin here at tanyasgarden.blogspot.com.

    May I use part of the information from your post above if I provide a backlink back to this website?

    Thanks,
    Jules

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  19. Hi Jules! Tell me please which part of my post you'd like to use and where are you going to use it (what site). I appreciate you asking my permission.
    Tatyana

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Thank you for stopping by and for your comment! I appreciate your time! See you soon on your blog!

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